Frequently Asked Questions

We identified a cybersecurity incident potentially impacting approximately 145.5 million U.S. consumers. Criminals exploited a U.S. website application vulnerability to gain access to certain files. We discovered the unauthorized access and acted immediately to stop the intrusion. We promptly engaged a leading, independent cybersecurity firm that conducted a comprehensive forensic review to determine the scope of the intrusion, including the specific data impacted. We also reported the criminal access to law enforcement and continue to work with authorities.

On March 1, 2018, as a result of ongoing analysis of data stolen in last year’s cybersecurity incident, Equifax Inc., announced that the company confirmed the identities of consumers whose partial driver’s license information was taken. Equifax was able to identify these consumers by referencing other information in proprietary company records that the attackers did not steal, and by engaging the resources of an external data provider.

Through these additional efforts, Equifax was able to identify 2.4 million U.S. consumers whose partial driver’s license information was stolen, but who were not in the previously identified affected population. This information was partial because, in the vast majority of cases, it did not include consumers’ home addresses, or their respective driver’s license states, dates of issuance, or expiration dates.

The methodology used in the company’s forensic examination of last year’s cybersecurity incident, with respect to impacted U.S. consumers, leveraged Social Security numbers (SSNs) and names as the key data elements to identify who was affected by the cyberattack, in part because forensics experts had determined that the attackers were predominately focused on stealing SSNs. Today’s newly identified consumers were not previously informed because their SSNs were not stolen together with their partial driver’s license information.

We learned of the incident on July 29, 2017, and acted immediately to stop the intrusion and conduct a forensic review.

On September 7, 2017, we disclosed that the incident potentially impacts approximately 143 million U.S. consumers. On October 2, 2017, we announced that the cybersecurity firm Mandiant had completed the forensic portion of its investigation of the incident. The review determined that approximately 2.5 million additional U.S. consumers were potentially impacted, for a total of 145.5 million. If you were part of this impacted group of consumers, we have established a dedicated website, www.equifaxsecurity2017.com, to help these U.S. consumers determine if their information was impacted.

As part of the investigation of this application vulnerability, we also identified unauthorized access to limited personal information for certain UK and Canadian residents. More information for UK and Canadian residents can be found at the following websites:

UK – www.equifax.co.uk/incident
Canada – www.consumer.equifax.ca/canada/equifaxsecurity2017/en_ca/

Update: On March 1, 2018, we disclosed that the incident also impacted partial driver’s license information for approximately 2.4 million U.S. consumers. Equifax will notify these impacted consumers by U.S. Postal mail.

U.S. consumers may have already visited the website to determine whether they have been impacted following both the September 7, 2017, and October 2, 2017, announcements. To minimize confusion, Equifax mailed written notices to all of the additional potentially impacted U.S. consumers identified by the October 2, 2017 update. Equifax will mail notifications to consumers whose partial driver’s license information was impacted as noted in the March 1, 2018, announcement.

Most of the consumer information accessed includes names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, in some instances, driver’s licenses. In addition, the following information was also accessed:

  • Credit card numbers for approximately 209,000 consumers; and
  • Certain dispute documents, which included personal identifying information, for approximately 182,000 consumers were accessed.

On March 1, 2018, we disclosed that the incident also impacted partial driver’s license information for approximately 2.4 million U.S. consumers. Equifax will notify these impacted consumers by U.S. Postal mail.

As part of our investigation of this application vulnerability, we also identified unauthorized access to limited personal information for certain UK and Canadian residents. We have found no evidence that personal information of consumers in any other country has been impacted.

There has NOT been an additional incident. This update is based on additional findings from the cybersecurity incident announced September 7, 2017.

In regards to those with partial driver’s license information stolen, the methodology used in the company’s forensic examination leveraged Social Security numbers (SSNs) and names as the key data elements to identify which U.S. consumers were affected by the cyberattack, in part because forensics experts had determined that the attackers were predominately focused on stealing SSNs. These consumers were not previously identified because their SSNs were not stolen together with their partial driver’s license information.

Yes. The forensic investigation – which determined what was stolen and how – was completed. We continue to engage in discussions with various stakeholders – including consumers, customers, Congress and regulators – and perform additional analysis on the stolen data where appropriate.

We have found no evidence of unauthorized activity on Equifax’s core consumer or commercial credit reporting databases.

Yes, this issue has been contained.

Equifax has been intensely investigating the scope of the intrusion with the assistance of a leading, independent cybersecurity firm to determine what information was accessed and who has been impacted. We know that criminals exploited a U.S. website application vulnerability. The vulnerability was Apache Struts CVE-2017-5638. We continue to work with law enforcement as part of our criminal investigation, and have shared indicators of compromise with law enforcement.

We engaged a leading, independent cybersecurity firm to conduct an assessment and provide recommendations on steps that can be taken to help prevent this type of incident from happening again.

We continue to work tirelessly to support consumers and make the necessary changes to minimize the risk that something like this happens again. We have taken numerous steps to review and enhance our cybersecurity practices, and we continue to work closely with our internal team and outside advisors to implement and accelerate long-term security improvements.

We recommend that consumers be vigilant in reviewing their account statements and credit reports, and that they immediately report any unauthorized activity to their financial institutions. We also recommend that they monitor their personal information and visit the Federal Trade Commission’s website, www.ftc.gov/idtheft, to obtain information about steps they can take to better protect against identity theft as well as information about fraud alerts and security freezes.

Equifax issued a national press release in order to notify U.S. consumers of this incident and has established a website, www.equifaxsecurity2017.com, where U.S. consumers can receive further information.

Equifax® Lock & Alert™ allows you to use your smartphone or computer to quickly lock and unlock your Equifax credit file – for free, for life.

While you can enroll in Lock & Alert both before and after your year of TrustedID Premier expires, you won’t be automatically enrolled in Lock & Alert.

 

A lock and a freeze have the same impact on your Equifax credit report, but they aren’t the same thing. Both generally prevent access to your Equifax credit report to open new credit accounts. Unless you temporarily lift or permanently remove a freeze, or unlock your Equifax credit report, it can’t be accessed to open new accounts (subject to certain exceptions). See more about exceptions below.

Security freezes (also known as credit freezes) are federally regulated and allow you to place, temporarily lift or permanently remove a freeze with a username and password or another method. Placing, temporarily lifting or permanently removing a security freeze is free.

At Equifax, you can manage your freeze:

  • Online, with your username and password after creating a myEquifax account.
  • By phone: Call us at (888) 298-0045. You'll be required to provide certain information to verify your identity. You'll also have the option to receive a one-time PIN by text message or answer questions based on information in your Equifax credit report for identity verification.
  • By mail: You can download this form and follow the instructions to manage a security freeze by mail. 

Credit report locks are mobile app-enabled and allow you to lock and unlock your Equifax credit report using identity verification techniques such as usernames and passwords.

Please note: If you have a security freeze on your Equifax credit report, you will need to remove it to lock your Equifax credit report. You can unfreeze your Equifax credit report by logging into myEquifax with your username and password. 

Exceptions: Freezing or locking your Equifax credit report will prevent access to it by certain third parties. Freezing or locking your Equifax credit report will not prevent access to your credit report at any other credit bureau. Entities that may still have access to your Equifax credit report include:

  • Companies like Equifax Global Consumer Solutions, which provide you with access to your credit report or credit score, or monitor your credit report as part of a subscription or similar service;
  • Companies that provide you with a copy of your credit report or credit score, upon your request;
  • Federal, state, and local government agencies and courts in certain circumstances;
  • Companies using the information in connection with the underwriting of insurance, or for employment, tenant or background screening purposes; 
  • Companies that have a current account or relationship with you, and collection agencies acting on behalf of those whom you owe; 
  • Companies that authenticate a consumer’s identity for purposes other than granting credit, or for investigating or preventing actual or potential fraud; and 
  • Companies that wish to make pre-approved offers of credit or insurance to you. To opt out of such pre-approved offers, visit www.optoutprescreen.com.

Equifax maintains consumers’ credit reports and provides information to certain customers, including credit card companies and lenders, so that they may offer pre-approved offers to consumers as permitted by law. Consumers that prefer not to receive such offers should visit www.optoutprescreen.com, or call toll free at 1-888-5-OPT OUT (or 1-888-567-8688). Consumers may also send an opt-out request in writing to Equifax Information Services LLC, P.O. Box 740123, Atlanta, GA 30374-0123. Consumers should include their complete name, full address, Social Security number, and signature. Equifax will remove the consumer’s name from its pre-approved offer database and share the request with the other two nationwide consumer reporting agencies.

 

Freezing or locking your Equifax credit report will not prevent access to your credit file at any other credit reporting agency. Freezing or locking your Equifax credit report prevents access by potential creditors and lenders, but there are exceptions. These exceptions may include:

  • Companies like Equifax Global Consumer Solutions, which provide you with access to your credit report or credit score, or monitor your credit report as part of a subscription or similar service;
  • Companies that provide you with a copy of your credit report or credit score, upon your request;
  • Federal, state, and local government agencies and courts in certain circumstances;
  • Companies using the information in connection with the underwriting of insurance, or for employment, tenant or background screening purposes;
  • Companies that have a current account or relationship with you, and collection agencies acting on behalf of those whom you owe;
  • Companies that authenticate a consumer's identity for purposes other than granting credit, or for investigating or preventing actual or potential fraud; and
  • Companies that wish to make pre-approved offers of credit or insurance to you. To opt out of such pre-approved offers, visit www.optoutprescreen.com.

Equifax maintains consumers' credit reports and provides information to certain customers, including credit card companies and lenders, so that they may offer pre-approved offers to consumers as permitted by law. Consumers that prefer not to receive such offers should visit www.optoutprescreen.com, or call toll free at 1-888-5-OPT-OUT (or 1-888-567-8688). Consumers may also send an opt-out request in writing to Equifax Information Services LLC, P.O. Box 740123, Atlanta, GA 30374-0123. Consumers should include their complete name, full address, Social Security number, and signature. Equifax will remove the consumer's name from its pre-approved offer database and share the request with the other two nationwide consumer reporting agencies.

The enrollment period for TrustedID Premier ended on January 31, 2018.

However, consumers impacted by the March 1, 2018, announcement, will receive further information about credit monitoring and identity theft protection.

Equifax is offering TrustedID Premier, which includes credit file monitoring and identity theft protection, complimentary for one year, starting on the date you activated the product.

The enrollment period for TrustedID Premier ended on January 31, 2018.

However, consumers impacted by the March 1, 2018, announcement, will receive further information about credit monitoring and identity theft protection.

TrustedID Premier provides you with copies of your Equifax credit report; the ability to lock your Equifax credit report; 3-Bureau credit monitoring of your Equifax, Experian and TransUnion credit reports; Internet scanning for your Social Security number; and identity theft insurance.

If you are enrolled in TrustedID Premier, you do not need to do anything at this time. Lock & Alert gives you the ability to lock and unlock your Equifax credit report, which you can also do with TrustedID Premier. Lock & Alert does have a mobile application option, but the functionality to lock and unlock your Equifax credit report is the same as in TrustedID Premier. You can enroll for both products if you choose.

Once you activate your product, you will be able to submit a request in TrustedID Premier to lock or unlock your Equifax credit report. Requests to lock and unlock your Equifax credit report are usually fulfilled quickly, but in rare cases could take a few minutes, so please take that into account when you are considering applying for new credit.

The enrollment period for TrustedID Premier ended on January 31, 2018.

However, consumers impacted by the March 1, 2018, announcement, will receive further information about credit monitoring and identity theft protection.

Equifax does not typically have information associated with minors, but you can use the “Am I Impacted?” tool on this site to determine if your child may have been impacted by the cybersecurity incident. In addition, if your child was part of the consumers impacted by the March 1, 2018, announcement, they will receive a letter by U.S. Postal mail.

To confirm, enrolling in the free credit file monitoring and identity theft protection products that we are offering as part of this cybersecurity incident does not prohibit consumers from taking legal action. We have already removed that language from the Terms of Use on the site www.equifaxsecurity2017.com. The Terms of Use on www.equifax.com do not apply to the TrustedID Premier product being offered to consumers as a result of the cybersecurity incident. Again, to be as clear as possible, we will not apply any arbitration clause or class action waiver against consumers for claims related to the free products offered in response to the cybersecurity incident or for claims related to the cybersecurity incident itself.

The prior Terms of Use will not apply to any consumers who have enrolled in TrustedID Premier, regardless of when they enrolled. In other words, even if a consumer enrolled prior to the change to the Terms of Use, the revised Terms of Use will apply to that consumer.

We are listening to issues that consumers are experiencing, and their suggestions are helping to further inform our actions. In response to consumer feedback about the arbitration clause and class action waiver, we have taken several actions:

  • We removed that language from the TrustedID Premier Terms of Use on September 8, 2017
  • We began pointing consumers on www.equifaxsecurity2017.com to the revised TrustedID Premier Terms of Use on September 9, 2017
  • We issued statements on September 8 and 10, 2017 further clarifying that the arbitration clause and class action waiver in the Equifax product Terms of Use on www.equifax.com do not apply to the TrustedID Premier product being offered to consumers or to the cybersecurity incident.
  • We updated the Equifax product Terms of Use on www.equifax.com on September 12, 2017 to state that those terms do not apply to the TrustedID Premier product or the cybersecurity incident

The product will expire after one year. We are not requesting consumers' credit card information when they sign up for the free credit file monitoring and identity theft protection we are offering to all U.S. consumers. Consumers who sign up for TrustedID Premier will not be automatically enrolled or charged after the conclusion of the complimentary year of TrustedID Premier.

Equifax will not reimburse consumers for the cost of a different product.

In 2013, Equifax acquired TrustedID, a company that offers credit file monitoring and identity theft protection products. We want to reassure all consumers going through the enrollment, scheduling and activation process that the TrustedID name in the URL and in the email address are valid.

A lock and a freeze have the same impact on your Equifax credit report, but they aren’t the same thing. Both generally prevent access to your Equifax credit report to open new credit accounts. Unless you temporarily lift or permanently remove a freeze, or unlock your Equifax credit report, it can’t be accessed to open new accounts (subject to certain exceptions). See more about exceptions below.

Security freezes (also known as credit freezes) are federally regulated and allow you to place, temporarily lift or permanently remove a freeze with a username and password or another method. Placing, temporarily lifting or permanently removing a security freeze is free.

At Equifax, you can manage your freeze:

  • Online, with your username and password after creating a myEquifax account.
  • By phone: Call us at (888) 298-0045. You'll be required to provide certain information to verify your identity. You'll also have the option to receive a one-time PIN by text message or answer questions based on information in your Equifax credit report for identity verification.
  • By mail: You can download this form and follow the instructions to manage a security freeze by mail. 

Credit report locks are mobile app-enabled and allow you to lock and unlock your Equifax credit report using identity verification techniques such as usernames and passwords.

Please note: If you have a security freeze on your Equifax credit report, you will need to remove it to lock your Equifax credit report. You can unfreeze your Equifax credit report by logging into myEquifax with your username and password. 

Exceptions: Freezing or locking your Equifax credit report will prevent access to it by certain third parties. Freezing or locking your Equifax credit report will not prevent access to your credit report at any other credit bureau. Entities that may still have access to your Equifax credit report include:

  • Companies like Equifax Global Consumer Solutions, which provide you with access to your credit report or credit score, or monitor your credit report as part of a subscription or similar service;
  • Companies that provide you with a copy of your credit report or credit score, upon your request;
  • Federal, state, and local government agencies and courts in certain circumstances;
  • Companies using the information in connection with the underwriting of insurance, or for employment, tenant or background screening purposes; 
  • Companies that have a current account or relationship with you, and collection agencies acting on behalf of those whom you owe; 
  • Companies that authenticate a consumer’s identity for purposes other than granting credit, or for investigating or preventing actual or potential fraud; and 
  • Companies that wish to make pre-approved offers of credit or insurance to you. To opt out of such pre-approved offers, visit www.optoutprescreen.com.

Equifax maintains consumers' credit reports and provides information to certain customers, including credit card companies, insurers, and lenders, so they may offer pre-approved offers to consumers as permitted by law. Consumers that prefer not to receive such offers should visit www.optoutprescreen.com, or call toll free at 1-888-5-OPT OUT (or 1-888-567-8688). Consumers may also send an opt-out request in writing to Equifax Information Services LLC, P.O. Box 740123, Atlanta, GA 30374-0123. Consumers should include their complete name, full address, Social Security number, and signature. Equifax will remove the consumer’s name from its pre-approved offer database and share the request with the other two nationwide consumer reporting agencies.

A fraud alert is a notice on your credit report that alerts creditors you may be a victim of fraud, including identity theft. A fraud alert can make it harder for someone to open unauthorized accounts in your name. It encourages lenders and creditors to take extra steps to verify your identity, such as contacting you by phone, before opening a new credit account in your name or making changes to existing accounts.

There are two types of fraud alerts you can place on your credit report, and both are free.

  • Initial fraud alert - If you believe you are or may become a victim of fraud or identity theft, you may place an initial fraud alert on your credit report. An initial fraud alert remains on your credit report for one year, unless you choose to remove it sooner, and can be renewed for additional one-year periods.
  • Extended fraud alert - If you have a police report or a Federal Trade Commission Identity Theft Report showing you're a victim of identity theft, you may place an extended fraud alert on your credit report. An extended fraud alert remains on your credit report for seven years unless you choose to remove it sooner. Click here for the extended fraud alert form.

You can contact any of the three nationwide credit bureaus to request a fraud alert. Once you have you placed a fraud alert on your credit report with one of the bureaus, that bureau will send a request to the other two bureaus to do the same, so you do not have to contact all three.

To place a fraud alert on your Equifax credit report, click here.

To learn about the difference between fraud alerts and security freezes, click here.

If you are enrolled in TrustedID Premier, visit www.trustedid.com, sign in and click the lock button.

There are some exceptions where a lock may be delayed or may not be possible. If you are enrolled in Lock & Alert, sign in to your account on the app or online and click or swipe to lock your credit report.

If you are enrolled in TrustedID Premier, visit www.trustedid.com, sign in and click the unlock button. There are some exceptions where a lock may be delayed or may not be possible.

If you are enrolled in Lock & Alert, sign in to your account on the app or online and click or swipe to unlock your credit report.

If a consumer decides to place a security freeze on their Equifax credit report, they can still use all the features in TrustedID Premier with the exception of the Lock/Unlock feature. A security freeze will not allow the consumer to lock or unlock their Equifax credit report through TrustedID Premier until the security freeze is lifted.

Placing, lifting and removing a security freeze is free. You can place, temporarily lift, or permanently remove a security freeze on your Equifax credit report online by creating a myEquifax account. A PIN is no longer required for online security freeze transactions.

To place, temporarily lift, or permanently remove a security freeze on your Equifax credit report, you can also call our automated line at (800) 685-1111. You will need the 10-digit PIN you received when the freeze was originally placed to lift or remove a freeze by phone or mail.

To submit a request to place, temporarily lift or permanently remove a security freeze by mail, please download this form for instructions.

After we receive the request and verify your identity, you will receive confirmation.

To place, temporarily lift or permanently remove a security freeze on your Experian or TransUnion credit reports, please contact them directly.
Experian: www.experian.com/freeze
TransUnion: freeze.transunion.com

To learn more about the difference between a security freeze and a credit report lock, click here.

Yes.

You don't need to choose a single option. We recommend choosing the ones that best suit your credit activity. See more about the various options below.

  • Fraud alert: A fraud alert is a notice on your credit report that alerts creditors you are or may be a victim of fraud, including identity theft. Fraud alerts are free, and fraud alert can make it harder for someone to open unauthorized accounts in your name. It encourages lenders and creditors to take extra steps to verify your identity, such as contacting you by phone, before opening a new credit account in your name or making changes to existing accounts. You can contact any of the three nationwide credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) to request a fraud alert. That bureau will send your request to the other two, so you do not have to contact all three. You can place a fraud alert online after creating a myEquifax account, by phone, or by mail; download this form for instructions.
  • Security freeze: A security freeze generally prevents access to your credit report to open new credit accounts. Unless you temporarily lift or permanently remove a freeze from your credit report, it can't be accessed to open new accounts (subject to certain exceptions). Freezes must be placed, lifted or removed separately with each of the three nationwide credit bureaus. Security freezes are free. You can place a security freeze on your Equifax credit report online after creating a myEquifax account, by phone, or by mail; download this form for instructions.
  • Credit report lock: A credit report lock generally has the same impact on your credit report as a security freeze. A credit report lock may allow you to lock and unlock your credit report online or by mobile app using identity verification techniques such as usernames, passwords and Touch ID or FaceID technology. Options may be available to lock your credit reports at the other two nationwide credit bureaus.

Please note that you can have either a security freeze or credit report lock on your Equifax credit report, but not both.

Click here to review who can view your credit report if you have a security freeze or lock.

Credit monitoring alerts are generated when certain changes to your credit reports occur. They are available within your TrustedID Premier product. In addition, you may customize your alert preferences at any time to receive notifications about new alerts by email and text message. Please note that standard message and data rates may apply.

Yes. There may be instances when your credit file cannot be monitored at one or more of the credit bureaus. You will receive monitoring at the credit bureaus where your credit file exists and can be monitored.

If you are enrolled in TrustedID Premier, it includes access to copies of your Equifax credit report. Otherwise, you are entitled to a free copy of your Equifax credit report once every 12 months through annualcreditreport.com.

Yes, Equifax call center agents have Español-speaking capabilities.

Yes, Equifax call center agents are able to assist consumers who are hearing impaired.

No. Equifax customer care agents will not be able to tell a consumer if their driver’s license information has been impacted. Over the coming weeks, Equifax will notify these impacted consumers via U.S. Postal mail if their driver’s license information has been impacted.

During routine monitoring, Equifax detected anomalous outbound traffic believed to be
                              suspicious from an online U.S. consumer portal.

Equifax has been intensely investigating the scope of the intrusion with the assistance
                              of a leading, independent cybersecurity firm to determine what information was accessed
                              and who has been impacted. We have found no evidence of unauthorized activity on Equifax's
                              core consumer or commercial credit reporting databases.

Equifax is conducting an investigation relating to those issues.

We recommend that consumers monitor their personal information and visit the Federal
                              Trade Commission's website, <a href="http://www.ftc.gov/idtheft" target="_blank"
                                rel="noopener">www.ftc.gov/idtheft</a>, to obtain information about steps consumers can
                              take to better protect against identity theft as well as information about fraud alerts
                              and security freezes.

You will only be called if you have left a message with the call center. Otherwise, you
                              will not be called by Equifax and should not provide personal information to anyone who
                              calls you or sends you a message about this incident.

If you believe that your bank account has been compromised, please work with your local
                              financial institution and local law enforcement agencies.

For U.S. consumers, to determine if your personal information may have been impacted, please visit www.equifaxsecurity2017.com. In addition, Equifax will be mailing letters to consumers whose driver’s license information may have been impacted as referenced in the March 1, 2018 announcement.

Equifax initially offered a credit file monitoring and identity theft protection product, TrustedID Premier, but the enrollment period ended on January 31, 2018.

However, consumers impacted by the March 1, 2018, announcement, will receive further information about a credit monitoring and identity theft protection product.

We do not believe that this incident has impacted the dispute resolution process.

If you are concerned about the personal information of your deceased spouse/relative,
                              please notify the Social Security Administration. The Social Security Administration
                              will
                              notify the nationwide credit reporting agencies, which will place a notation on the
                              deceased's credit file.

As one of the three major credit bureaus, Equifax receives information from a variety of
                              businesses and other sources.

If you believe you are the victim of identity theft, you should contact the appropriate
                              authorities, including local law enforcement.

If you believe you are the victim of identity theft, you should contact the appropriate
                              authorities, including local law enforcement.

For more information about how to dispute information on your Equifax credit report, please visit our online dispute page at www.equifax.com/personal/disputes.

As part of your TrustedID Premier product, you will receive identity theft insurance up
                              to $1 million. The identity theft insurance provided in TrustedID Premier is underwritten
                              by American Bankers Insurance Company of Florida or its affiliates. This description is a
                              summary and intended for informational purposes only and does not include all terms,
                              conditions and exclusions of the policies described. Please refer to the actual policies
                              for terms, conditions and exclusions of coverage. Coverage may not be available in all
                              jurisdictions.

To cancel an existing subscription to an Equifax credit monitoring product, you will need
                              to log into the product and proceed with the cancellation process, which can be found in
                              the Manage Billing portion of your online account.

As part of our investigation, we have identified unauthorized access to limited personal information for certain UK and Canadian residents.

More information for UK and Canadian residents can be found at the following websites:

UK – www.equifax.co.uk/incident
Canada – www.consumer.equifax.ca/canada/equifaxsecurity2017/en_ca/

Letters were mailed to impacted consumers in the UK and Canada that will contain further information on complimentary credit monitoring and identity theft protection services. More information for UK and Canadian residents can be found at the following websites:

UK – www.equifax.co.uk/incident
Canada – www.consumer.equifax.ca/canada/equifaxsecurity2017/en_ca/

For men and women on active duty, there are three options:

Place a security freeze
Any service member may place a security freeze on his or her credit report online or by phone or U.S. mail.

  • Online by creating a myEquifax account
  • Phone: 888-534-0203 or 470-373-1187
  • U.S. Mail:
    Equifax Information Services LLC
    P.O. Box 740244
    Atlanta, GA 30374

 

Your PIN will be mailed to your address on file or, if you are overseas, to the address you provide. You will need this PIN to lift or remove the security freeze by phone or mail. A PIN is not required to manage a security freeze using your myEquifax account.

For more information regarding security freezes, including the difference between a security freeze and a credit report lock, please review the “General FAQs” and “Consumer FAQs” sections of this site.

Enroll in Lock & Alert™

  • Lock & Alert allows U.S. consumers who are 18 or older to quickly lock and unlock their Equifax credit report for free, for life.
  • Locking your Equifax credit report may help better protect against unauthorized access. You’ll receive a confirmation every time you lock or unlock your Equifax credit report.
  • In most cases, the enrollment process for service members will be the same as for any consumer. Service members may enroll online or download the Lock & Alert app from the Apple® App Store or Google Play™ store.

 

Place an active duty alert Any active duty service member may request an active duty alert for their Equifax credit report online or by phone or U.S. mail.

  • Online by creating a myEquifax account;
  • Phone: 888-534-0203 or 470-373-1187
  • U.S. Mail:
    Equifax Information Services LLC
    P.O. Box 740244
    Atlanta, GA 30374

 

For more information on active duty alerts, please see the next question and answer.

An active duty alert is available for service members on active military duty who want to help minimize their risk of fraud or identity theft while deployed. An active duty alert is similar to an initial fraud alert; it can make it harder for someone to open unauthorized accounts in your name. It encourages lenders and creditors to take extra steps to verify your identity, such as contacting you by phone, before opening a new credit account in your name or making changes to existing accounts.

An active duty alert is free and lasts for one year, and your name is removed from pre-screened credit card or insurance offers for two years.

You can contact any of the three nationwide credit bureaus to request an active duty alert. Once you have placed an active duty alert on your credit report with one of the bureaus, that bureau will send a request to the other two bureaus to do the same, so you do not have to contact all three.

To place an active duty alert, create or sign in to a myEquifax account, or call our automated line at 800-685-1111. You can also place an active duty alert by mail by downloading and following the instructions on the Alert Request Form.

Yes, if you are unable to take action such as placing, lifting or removing a security freeze, placing an active duty alert or enrolling in a service, someone with a Power of Attorney can do it for you.

Equifax will accept either a general Power of Attorney or a limited Power of Attorney. For limited POAs, the document should include a grant of authority to take action on the service member’s credit reports.

The person with the Power of Attorney will need to send the following required information to the contact information below:

  • A cover letter including:
    • The authorized representative's first and last name;
    • The authorized representative's contact information such as telephone number and/or email address, if applicable;
    • A brief summary of the request;
    • The service member’s first and last name, and Social Security number
  • A copy of the notarized POA document
  • A copy of the authorized representative’s driver's license or valid state identification that has his or her name as shown on the notarized documents

The authorized representative will need to submit the required information described above via fax or mail:

  • Fax: (888) 826-0689
  • U.S. Mail:
    Equifax Information Services LLC
    PO Box 740244
    Atlanta, GA 30374

Security clearance may depend on various factors. You might consider temporarily lifting a security freeze or unlocking your credit report while going through a security clearance process.

Yes. Please review the FAQ sections of this site to learn more about the 2017 cybersecurity incident and other relevant information for consumers.